About Angela

Posts by Angela:

The journey of discovery

 

Go inward. Go deeply.

Let your emotional reactions lead the way.

Inquire and inquire, and just when you think you’re done, inquire again.

 

Ask the simple but important questions.

Then, by listening and feeling, you will be given the sacred answers.

 

When you hit the impenetrable wall, seek for the wisdom that will take you further.

It will be offered to you in the most unexpected places.

Pay attention.

 

Savor these unearthly moments of realization.

Bask in the magic that manifests the lessons into physical form.

Let this be your motivation, and serve as your guide.

 

Recognize when you come across the knots of misalignment.

When you find these knots, let childlike curiosity be your guide.

Turn them around and around until you find the way in.

Be patient and gentle, but persistent and resourceful.

Set your intention and allow Grace to guide your hands.

You will untangle them, and the knots will come undone.

 

And when they do, let the river of tears they were damming flow unencumbered.

And when the tears run dry, let all of it go.

Allow the now-empty space to fill with love and forgiveness.

The healing will happen naturally; it always does.

 

The most important thing to remember is this –

Meet everything you find with unconditional love.

Meet everything with tenderness, acceptance, and compassion.

 

You will encounter some monsters on your path.

Some really ugly things.

Things you’ll wish you’d never seen, because once you do, you can’t unsee them.

Look upon all of them with eyes of love.

And listen to them with the ears of love, as a mother would upon her wounded child.

See them truthfully, for what they are, and with understanding of how they came to be.

Be brutally honest and just as brutally loving.

 

The journey, the exploration, and the bringing of love and light into that darkness will heal you and transform you.

It will transform the very essence of your soul.

 

Then turn all of that love and compassion out into the world.

Find the courage to live authentically and vulnerably.

Listen closely, taking only those actions that feel good and right in the very center of your being.

 

The truth and love, inside and outside, will set you free.

 

Spiritualism (and a tiny bit of free-will)

 

Leaving occultism behind, let’s talk about spiritualism.

Spiritualism is the belief that the spirits of the dead have both the ability and the inclination to communicate with the living. The afterlife, or the “spirit world“, is seen by spiritualists, not as a static place, but as one in which spirits continue to evolve. These two beliefs: that contact with spirits is possible, and that spirits are more advanced than humans, lead spiritualists to a third belief, that spirits are capable of providing useful knowledge about moral and ethical issues, as well as about the nature of God. (Wikipedia)

Spiritualists reject the rituals and ceremonial magic central to occult practice, in favor of much more practical (albeit supernatural) healing methods. Their practices involve the communication with spirits (both discarnate entities, as well as masters and guides) through the work of mediumship. They don’t travel into the unseen worlds, nor engage in any manipulations thereof.

I feel a lot more resonance with these approaches to healing work, although I don’t have any mediumship abilities.

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Psychic and occult realms

 

While I’m not generally interested in the occult, I came across a truly fascinating book a few months ago: Psychic Self-Defense: The Classic Instruction Manual for Protecting Yourself Against Paranormal Attack by Dion Fortune. (The title sounds sort of campy, but the book is not that way at all).

A 20th century British psychologist, occultist, Christian kabbalist, and author, Fortune (1890-1946) is considered one of the most significant and respected authorities in this field. She is actually quite erudite, articulate, and seems to possess an impressively proper disposition and temperament for someone doing genuine work in this area. You get the sense that she’s really coming from a place of integrity within (as much as can be expected from an occultist, I suppose).

My spiritual orientation is all about the inward focus; the inner journey to healing and self-realization. Occult work, on the other hand, whether white (good intentioned) or black (bad intentioned), is very outward focused. It seems to involve all sorts of manipulation of the unseen world and energies, in order to affect three dimensional reality (for good or bad). 

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Rumi, Sufism, and the whirling dervish

 

Combining the topics of my last two posts (ecstatic prayer ritual and Rumi, because why not?) I figured I’d mention the whirling dervishes.

This tradition originates from the Mevlevi Order of Konya, which was founded by the followers of Rumi (13th century Sufi mystic and poet). It is believed that upon hearing rhythmic playing and prayer in the outdoor market, Rumi was overcome with mystical bliss, threw up his hands, and began whirling in ecstasy.

For the dervishes (which is the name for initiates in the Sufi tradition) ritual dance and whirling is part of a mystical ecstatic tradition and ceremony known as the Sama. It is understood as a spiritual journey of ascent through the mind and love to union with the divine.

“Turning towards the truth, the follower grows through love, deserts his ego, finds the truth, and arrives at the “Perfect”. He then returns from this spiritual journey as a man who has reached maturity and a greater perfection, able to love and to be of service to the whole of creation.” Wikipedia

Sound familiar?

The spiritual order (and Sufi practice) was outlawed in 1925 under Turkish law. The dervishes are currently permitted to perform their dancing, but only as a tourist attraction.

For an interesting look at Sufism and the various levels of tolerance throughout the Islamic world, check out the documentary Sufi Soul: The Mystic Music of Islam (available on Netflix).

If you have an interest in a deeper look at Sufi traditions, spiritual teachings and practice, visit the work of Kabir Helminski, a prolific and erudite Sufi teacher. Also, the work and writings of Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee are fantastic and worthy of exploration.

 

Oneness

 

Last night I met with Rumi. I met him in that field he talked about, you know the one – that place that is beyond judgment and acceptance, beyond right and wrong. 

The field came to me at night, and woke me from my sleep. Between waking and dreaming, I recognized it immediately, as I struggled to find my words.

This field transcends right and wrong. It is simultaneously higher than, and fully merged with, the human condition. It gives the impression that it is above, way above. But like different layers of a cake, it’s not separate; it’s all part of one thing. From the field, you can sort of look down and see everyone right there below.

Timeless and weightless, being in this field feels sort of like being suspended in honey. Visually it’s translucent, and kind of thick and gooey. These places always seem to have a slight yellow tinge to them.

In this place, the love is so strong, and the power so great, that it doesn’t waste time or energy on judgments. Judgments, labels, and the struggle to accept the unacceptable are silly here. Good and evil irrelevantly cancel each other out. It is love beyond those things; it has no concern for them. The love is so deep, so unconditional, so unilateral, that everything is perfect. Everyone is perfect. It doesn’t matter what they are. It doesn’t matter what they do, or fail to do. It loves wholly and completely, without question. It loves solidly, without a fluttering of doubt. It loves always, because it is one with everything there is.

I only got to stay for a moment. And as it was fading away, it left me with a single thought: “This is oneness.”